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20121124
20121124
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
't get gro growth if you raise taxif rates. california and several other states, the top rate is approaching 50% effectively. fie they have as much incentive to fire somebody to lower costs is to hire somebody to increase revenues. lou: so we have a contemporaneous experiment going on.t it is a high-risk experiment, but nonetheless an experiment.ra in california, bringing tax levels above 50% in the nation getting ready to move higher.oio are we going to see california behave as the canary in the colh wind, if you will, when it comes to economic growth and theabili ability to support an ever-growing government? >> of go course, people are jusg fleeing california. t california is a microcosm of what happens to countries that raise their tax rates. entrepreneurs flee and welfarela recipients pour in, and you have an unsustainable state of affairs. that is california. silin unsustainable. meanwhile, they are destroying silicon valley. it is america's greatest asset., the source of all our technology and it is our potential for everth, and we are circling it over with a cast of g
. >> but i look so good. >> bill: it is true, out in california that is what happens. what is the emotional attachment the music has to the american people? >> we try to do in our songs, themes that relate to people. when we started out it was serving, southern california, california girls. it was going to the dance, surfer girl. all these great things that were going on in our lives. i think they were going on in millions of lives. we connected through the themes along with the harmonies and created that feeling. >> bill: that's what it is. people go to see your concert and listen to your records because they are celebrating their own lives. every time a song comes on, a flashback -- when i was a lauer, i was singing slope john b. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> bill: you nice have connected to the american people when your songs come on, they remember the good times in their lives. >> that's right. ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ ♪ >> bill: you are going to be 70-years-old, next week. >> yeah. >> bill: you wrote surfer girl my personal favorite. >> when i was 19. >> bill: can you believe you are
't without controversy. from california to kentucky, protesters rallied against what they say is walmart's retaliation against workers who speak out about issues like pay and health care. walmart has denied those claims and says it only knew of, quote, a few dozen demonstrations. >> moving overseas now, actually we'll get to that in a movement stay here for a gas leak blamed for an explosion at a split club. this is in springfield, massachusetts. look at it here. this blast leveled the club and damaged 25 other buildings in that neighborhood. 18 people hurt and no one killed, fortunately. our affiliate wggb says people felt the explosion four miles away. a city official says some of those damaged buildings will be demolished today. >>> and now to egypt. demonstrators there have taken to the streets in cairo to protest against president mohamed morsi. morsi expanded his powers this week, and that means no one can challenge his decisions. they can't be overturned. that's led to anger among the people and some of the judges. cnn's reza sayah is in cairo this morning. >> reporter: thanks hav
didn't know you needed an additional law. >> in california, that is not true necessarily. they do have something called a decent exposure. but there is what we call elements of a crime. and any time the prosecutor wants to find you guilty of the crime, have the jury find you guilty, they have to find three things. the third element says you have to be naked and exposing your genitals for the purpose of either sexually arousing yourself or somebody else. so martin, if you are just walking down the street saying i like to be free in the breeze, guess what? that is not necessarily indecent exposure. so you can be naked all you want, as long as it is not for that horrible purpose of just wanting to be free. >> well, does it limit my free speech of going without clothing? >> well, i don't think so, there is speech and then just letting it all hang out. so there is speech, and there is i have a right to express myself by being completely naked. and the city council is saying no, oddly enough, the reason he proposes the legislation, when naked people sit on public benches they don't put a tow
% of the assets they need for current and future retirees. look at the northern california joint pension, 20,000 workers funded at 65%. they only have 60% of what they need. to fix this pension problem, new workers. they're trying to ganize wal-mart. they want these wal-mart workers to pay contributions to the pension fund and they won't be getting it out for many years that which point -- gerri: this points out what a prize walmart is. 1.3 million workers, and it would be, a bailout for the unions. they are not concerned about wal-mart workers here. it is about their own obligations. >> you don't think they're telling these wal-mart workers if they join the union if walmart becomes unionize these workers would buy into these pensions. they're not telling them that all. there saying join a save you will be better off but these workers would be better off with i r as and 401(k) plans and pension they will get back rather than putting money into a failed pension. none of your listeners would put money into a pension of 55%. gerri: jeff flock was on the ground looking at who was out there doing
have to do this again. >> greg fletcher, walmart associate in california. appreciate you joining us today and give your brother-in-law and your wife my best. >> i will. thank you. >>> so this is something that labor's been working out for a long time. and yesterday, i think, was bigger than anything that's ever happened in the labor actions against walmart. there's two ways to read what happened yesterday. there's one in the context of how many workers they have, which is 1.6 million associates and it's a massive operation, and so even if 100, 200, 1,000, or 15,000 people walk out, that's relatively small. the other way to look at it is in the history of walmart which has been resistant to any kind of concerted labor action. i'm curious on your take away from yesterday. >> well, i think it's not big enough yet to see this as the turning point. i do agree that in the history of walmart, this is a bigger deal than we've seen before. and i think the fact that it comes after the election and after occupy and occupy sandy, i think, was a big deal too. there was a little bit of a shift of
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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